Face in the Window 

Face in the Window is spoken by a woman identified in the script as Shelley.  In dim light we can see three chairs and a window.  Shelley tells us about a woman who takes the train to work in the city, passing through abandoned, devastated buildings where people once lived.  Sometimes, she says, the tracks pass close to buildings where people live.  One morning she sees a face of a young woman who raises a hand and presses her palm against the glass, as if asking for help.  She doesn’t see the woman on the ride home that night, but the next morning, in the same window, she sees what she had seen the previous morning.  She thinks it must be a trick of the light, that the same girl would not be at the same window at exactly that time in that exact posture.  The next morning she sees the girl again and is unable to concentrate at work, staring at the wall while her phone rings.  Her boss asks her if she’s sick, and an old woman on the train home asks her if she’s ill.  She dreams of searching for the girl and the next morning calls in sick to work.  She can’t stop thinking of the girl and takes a cab to that part of the city where the building is.  The cab driver is not happy about driving in that part of town and refuses to wait for her when she gets out.  She goes into the building, thinks she hears music, and climbs the stairs.  When she gets to what she thinks is the right floor, she goes to the side of the building facing the tracks and walks to the end of the hall.  The number has been torn off the opened door, but she sees the window and three chairs.  Through the window she can see the tracks and hears the clatter of the train approaching.  She looks out the window and, in the passing train, sees a girl looking back at her.  She raises her hand and rests her palm against the glass.  Lights out.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s